The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

A new study finds turning vacant lots into green space can improve the mental health of residents in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.

More than 43,000 lots in Philadelphia sit vacant, many invaded with overgrown weeds and strewn with trash. As CityLab has previously reported, this is as much a public-health problem as it is an economic one. Walking past such a site, researchers have previously found, can make your heat beat just a little faster, indicating increased levels of stress. And it’s no wonder: Studies have also shown that urban blight tends to attract crime and gun violence.

It’s all taking a toll on the mental health of residents in vacancy-hit neighborhoods. “People felt that [the vacancies and abandonment] fractured ties between neighbors, [affecting] the social milieu of the neighborhood,” says Eugenia South, a senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine who’s been studying the health effects of urban blight in Philadelphia. People also told her that they “felt stigmatized, neglected by the government,” as well as experiencing “depression, anxiety, stress, and fear.”

Read The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

Kelly Lay has been gardening since she was three-years-old. 

Now a nursery specialist at a Lowes in central Illinois, Lay has turned her natural gift for gardening into a profession. And in her spare time Lay moderates r/seedswap, a small Reddit group dedicated to the swapping of seeds. Yes, honest to goodness seeds.

Cherimoya, mizuna, pineapple tomato, sweetsop, lemon cucumber, husk cherry, and pond apple seeds are among the many varieties of seeds being traded on r/seedswap, which facilitates national swaps online. There are also several groups on Facebook like the Great American Seed Swap/Trade Project.

Read The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture

Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture

S ACGA

This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground. These lists are in no way meant to be complete. Each main idea will probably trigger more questions, so an assortment of ways to carry out that idea are presented; pick and choose those that seem to apply to your own situation.

FORM A PLANNING COMMITTEE

  • Determine if there really is a need and desire for a garden
  • What kind of garden–vegetable, flower, trees, a combination?
  • Who will the garden serve–kids, seniors, special populations,people who just want an alternative to trash?

Read Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

A garden grows in Marble Hill via The Riverdale Press

A garden grows in Marble Hill via The Riverdale Press

A garden grows in Marble Hill via The Riverdale Press

By TIFFANY MOUSTAKAS

A year was just the right amount of time for the Marble Hill Garden to start sowing its seeds in a new location.

The original garden — located on the east side of West 228th Street and Broadway — was the brainchild of Jacki Fischer, founder and project manager of the Marble Hill Garden Project, as well as Juanli Carrión, an artist who founded an interactive public art and community garden nonprofit called Outer Seed Shadow.

Together, the two rounded up a team of residents at Marble Hill Houses who soon learned how to plant and grow various vegetables and herbs. It was all part of Fischer and Carrión’s project to promote accessible and healthy eating.

Now the duo has launched another garden on the west side of West 228th — referred to as the terrace garden — thanks to the help of artist and space designer Cheryl Wing-Zi Wong, construction leader Anthony Del Orbe, and project coordinator Vicky Zambrano. The entire process took about 10 months as opposed to the nearly two years for the east garden to come together. 

Read My Turf: Vegetables and friendship blossoming in community gardens via The Straits Times


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

While the city scrambles to sell the lots for redevelopment, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has been working with residents to turn some into parks and community gardens. Now a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association from South and her colleagues points to evidence that their efforts are, in fact, having a positive effect on residents’ well-being. In particular, turning lots into green spaces alleviated the feeling of depression among residents who live in the poorest neighborhoods the researchers studied.

Read The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The LEED Gold-seeking Edible Academy teaches urban farming in NYC via Inhabitat

The LEED Gold-seeking Edible Academy teaches urban farming in NYC via Inhabitat

The LEED Gold-seeking Edible Academy teaches urban farming in NYC via Inhabitat

New York-based architecture firm Cooper Robertson and Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects (MNLA) recently completed the latest addition to the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx — the Edible Academy, a new LEED Gold-seeking facility that will teach the greater community about sustainable agriculture, healthy eating and the environment. Created as an expansion of the New York Botanical Garden’s Children’s Gardening Program founded in 1956, the $28 million state-of-the-art development covers three acres on the grounds of the existing Ruth Rea Howell Vegetable Garden. The facilities offer a wide array of programming as well as many sustainable features such as vegetated green roofs, composting toilets and geothermal heating and cooling.

Read The LEED Gold-seeking Edible Academy teaches urban farming in NYC via Inhabitat


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

Introduction:

Everybody Has Something To Offer: Components Of Garden Leadership

The following description of leadership roles is by no means meant to be complete. Seattle P-Patch gardens employ many creative examples of management. Your P-Patch would not function but for the leadership roles assumed by gardeners every year. The degree of leadership varies from site to site. Individuals and/or groups oversee, facilitate, and delegate the tasks necessary to manage a whole P-Patch. The framework suggested below can be done either individually or as a team.

Read A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library