News: Cool Schools: St. Thomas School builds community garden via ABC 57 News

News: Cool Schools: St. Thomas School builds community garden via ABC 57 News

News: Cool Schools: St. Thomas School builds community garden via ABC 57 News

ELKHART, Ind. — St. Thomas School in Elkhart is growing the minds of its students, while teaching them how to grow their own food.  

The students there are practicing hands-on learning through a new community garden.

“It was an under-utilized space i think that we had,” said Principal Chris Adamo.

An unused courtyard has been transformed into a garden budding with laughter.

The idea was executed beyond expectation, according to Adamo. He said, it was the director of lunch services, Immacolata Varacalli, who originally thought of a use for the courtyard.

She says after walking through the empty space every day she thought, what about a school garden?

“After researching, the school garden benefits the school so much, said Varacalli. “The children learn from beginning to end about fresh produce and how beneficial it is for us.”

But they are also learning about teamwork. Students say, it was a bonding experience.

Read Cool Schools: St. Thomas School builds community garden via ABC 57 News


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News: New Community Garden Project At University Of Indianapolis Enhances Healthy Options For Neighborhood via UIndy 360

News: New Community Garden Project At University Of Indianapolis Enhances Healthy Options For Neighborhood via UIndy 360

News: New Community Garden Project At University Of Indianapolis Enhances Healthy Options For Neighborhood via UIndy 350

With gloves and shovels in hand, volunteers got to work on a community garden on the University of Indianapolis campus, with the goal of bringing access to fresh produce to the surrounding neighborhood. The UIndy and CHNw Community Garden (Serve360°) project is part of an ongoing partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network to provide health- and wellness-related opportunities to the Indianapolis southside.

The garden is located on the west side of the United Methodist Church at 4002 Otterbein Ave. From 1 to 5 p.m. on Friday, April 20, volunteers from the University of Indianapolis, Community Hospital South, Purdue Extension and South Indy Quality of Life Plan cleaned nine raised garden beds, glued the bed’s cement blocks, shoveled and spread dirt, pulled weeds, and did some planting. 

Read New Community Garden Project At University Of Indianapolis Enhances Healthy Options For Neighborhood via UIndy 360


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News: Community garden plants seeds of grow-your-own via Daily Journal Online

News: Community garden plants seeds of grow-your-own via Daily Journal Online

News: Community garden plants seeds of grow-your-own via Daily Journal Online

Most everyone agrees there’s nothing quite like the taste of fresh, homegrown produce. But, what if the thought of a backyard garden is harrowing? A group in one community came up with a perfect solution – and the interest is growing as fast as the plants.

This spring marks the second growing season for the Farmington Community Garden. Melanie Montgomery is with the group and says the garden is made up of a “group of residents who have come together to build a garden.”

There are 42 raised beds on the corner of Perrine Road and Boyce Street in Farmington. Each bed measures four feet by eight feet.

Read Community garden plants seeds of grow-your-own via Daily Journal Online


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News: Larkspur Community Garden: growing strong since 1982 via Marin Independent Journal

Great story about a long-running community garden in Marin shows what can happen once you get a community garden rolling. — Douglas

News: Larkspur Community Garden: growing strong since 1982 via Marin Independent Journal

News: Larkspur Community Garden: growing strong since 1982 via Marin Independent Journal

What with planting and thinning and weeding and harvesting, the only thing that takes more time than managing a garden is managing the gardens of 71 other people.

“Gardening is never done,” says Stephen Conner, who became the overall coordinator of the Larkspur Community Garden during its first year in 1982. Nancy Spivey, head of Larkspur Parks & Recreation at the time, started the garden because she understood recreation involved more than just sports. “Gardeners are bending, stretching, and weeding on their hands and knees — and it is therapeutic to get your hands in the soil.”

Read Larkspur Community Garden: growing strong since 1982 via Marin Independent Journal


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News: Community gardens provide food, educational space for CU via Daily Illini

Community Garden News from Around The World

News: Community gardens provide food, educational space for CU via Daily Illini

News: Community gardens provide food, educational space for CU via Daily Illini

What started as an abandoned garden has transformed into an educational space and a source of food for low-income families.

Prosperity Gardens is a nonprofit organization in Champaign that provides students a chance to learn about gardening and the opportunity to grow their own produce. The organization also sells its produce at a discounted rate during the summer for low-income families.

Prosperity Gardens is just one example of a community garden in the Champaign-Urbana area.

According to 2014 data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, there are 1,311 community gardens in the United States. 62 of these are in Illinois.

Nicole Bridges, lead program coordinator at Prosperity Gardens, said there are approximately five community gardens in Champaign and Urbana combined.

Read Community gardens provide food, educational space for CU via Daily Illini

News: Why So Many Public Libraries Are Now Giving Out Seeds via Atlas Obscura

News: Why So Many Public Libraries Are Now Giving Out Seeds via Atlas Obscura

News: Why So Many Public Libraries Are Now Giving Out Seeds via Atlas Obscura

ON A SHELF JUST BEHIND the reference desk at the Harmon branch of the PhoenixPublic Library, are small pouches of seeds. Like the books and DVDs, they’re available to check out. The library allows visitors to take a few packets of the vegetable and flower seeds home for free just by showing their library card.

“It’s innovative, it’s different, it’s another way for people to interact with the library,” says Lee Franklin, the library’s spokesperson. “It’s been really well received.”

The Phoenix Public Library first put seeds on the shelves at one of its branches in 2014. Franklin says they were immediately in high demand. Now the library distributes an average of 1,000 seed packets per month across nine of its 17 branches. Franklin says the program has proven to be sustainable with minimal costs—around $300-$500 to bring a seed-sharing program to a new branch of the library. And, Franklin says, the organizational tasks of offering seeds fit seamlessly with the library’s existing cataloguing system.

Read the entire article: Why So Many Public Libraries Are Now Giving Out Seeds via Atlas Obscura

Thanks to City Farmer News for sharing the article


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News: Hugelkultur, one alternative to traditional raised beds via A Way To Garden

News: Hugelkultur, one alternative to traditional raised beds via A Way To Garden

News: Hugelkultur, one alternative to traditional raised beds via A Way To Garden

News: Hugelkultur, one alternative to traditional raised beds via A Way To Garden

FOR 25 YEARS I have grown my vegetables in raised beds, but the kind that you need to purchase lumber and bolts and use a saw and hammer to construct, then fill entirely with soil and compost. Lately I’ve been looking longingly at photos of a centuries-old, sustainable way of making raised garden beds called hugelkultur, or hill culture.

“It’s like sheet mulching or lasagna gardening,” says Dave Whitinger of All Things Plants, who regularly lectures on the subject, but in hugelkultur, “wood is the first level of your sheet-mulched bed.” That’s his robust hugelkultur onion bed up top.

Read the entire article or listen to the podcast


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