Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council

Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council

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1. Kid gardens must be kid-based.
This means that kids help generate the ideas for what will be there, help with construction and planting, and are responsible for maintenance. Grown-up’s need to facilitate and show how, but not do everything. Focus on the process of involving them, and they will then take ownership.

2. Develop the garden to be appropriate for the site and regional conditions.
Involve the kids in the site analysis process so they understand how important the light, soil, drainage and other environmental factors are to having a garden. Develop the garden so the features and plant choices are adapted to local conditions, so you are not “working against nature.”

3. Focus on functional garden design, not how it will look.
Start the design process by determining what the children want to be doing and learning in the garden. Base the features on the practical functions they will serve, and don’t worry too much about aesthetics. Gardens that serve as hands-on learning laboratories for kids will be beautiful because they are well-used and well-loved spaces. Also remember that the children’s sense of what is pretty may not be yours; that’s ok because the garden is their space.

Read Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

PITTSFORD — The Pittsford Village Farm isn’t just growing vegetables: It’s growing gardeners.

And in Pittsford, they start them young.

From 11 a.m. to noon every Saturday, the Pittsford Village Farm Community Garden hosts its new Sprouts Club, teaching young people the ins and outs of gardening, from earth worms and healthy soil to different varieties of cherry tomatoes.

The club was the brainchild of co-founder Laurie Kamuda of Kamuda’s Country Market, who wanted to do something for the community garden, and the local kids as well.

So she, fellow community member Ginny Carroccia and community garden coordinator Krysta Piccoli decided to join forces and put the two ideas together: a kids garden club, with an 8-foot by 20-foot community garden plot all their own.

Read Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Tsuut’ina green thumbs gather to create community garden for food bank via CBC

Tsuut’ina green thumbs gather to create community garden for food bank via CBC

Tsuut'ina green thumbs gather to create community garden for food bank via CBC

A dozen volunteers on the Tsuut’ina First Nation are getting their hands dirty for the good of the community.

With a little help from Grow Calgary, members of the band have been digging, tilling and planting all week to create a community garden.

Everything grown will ultimately go to the Tsuut’ina Nation Food Bank.

“We can feed about a thousand families come July with what we are growing, which works out nicely because next month will be the one-year [anniversary] for the food bank,” said Crystal Starlight.

Read Tsuut’ina green thumbs gather to create community garden for food bank via CBC


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Solar panel lights up the Community Garden via UCalgary

Solar panel lights up the Community Garden via UCalgary

Solar panel lights up the Community Garden via UCalgary

Summer took a little longer than usual to arrive this year, but it was worth the wait for members of the UCalgary Community Garden Club near Cascade Hall — a new garden shed has been equipped with off-grid solar that will provide some electricity in a sustainable way to help power phones and other equipment.

Every year, the Community Garden Club invites dozens of members to connect with food by planting, tending and harvesting a bounty of fresh organic vegetables. This year, thanks to the help of another campus club, Emerging Leaders for Solar Energy (ELSE), the gardeners will be able to plug in while they work.

Read Solar panel lights up the Community Garden via UCalgary

More information on raised bed gardening

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

News: Bethlehem students build community garden via The Kentucky Standard

News: Bethlehem students build community garden via The Kentucky Standard

News: Bethlehem students build community garden via The Kentucky Standard 

 Students from Bethlehem recently joined together to create a community garden for the Turnaround resource center in Lebanon Junction.

This center helps community members turn their lives around and provides an opportunity for the town of Lebanon Junction with resources and community support.

Read Bethlehem students build community garden via The Kentucky Standard


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Community Garden Plots: Make the Most of Limited Space via Green Living Ideas

Community Garden Plots: Make the Most of Limited Space via Green Living Ideas

Community Garden Plots: Make the Most of Limited Space via Green Living Ideas

1)   INTERPLANT: this is a technique that can be planted once or used with succession planting (tip #2). If planting your garden at one time companion planting can be used. Companion planting is when planting certain plants next to each other so that they gain mutual benefit in some way. An example of this is to plant basil next to trellised tomatoes. As the tomatoes grow up, lower leaves can be pruned, while basil is pinched to become bushy.

2)   SUCCESSION: when one plant has come to the end of it’s life span, then something else can be planted in the space that was created. An example of succession planting: when spinach is harvested by the roots, lettuce can then be planted. Since lettuce will go to seed (or bolt) in heat, this space can then be planted with beets for fall harvest. Depending on your plant choices and your location, 2-3 crops can come from the same space.

3)   VERTICAL: Trellises to grow plants up are great for vining and climbing plants like beans, peas, cucumbers, and certain types of small melons. I’ve made trellises in an upside-down “V” shape so that vining plants will cover the ground with shade, which then will extend the harvest of plants that like cooler temperatures and less sunlight, such as lettuce.

4)    DESIGN DIFFERENT: think outside the box of your plot… or better said, is think different inside the box. Now that the plot is designed using a vertical element such as trellising, how about not thinking in the mono-cropped pattern of rows? When using a design such as the keyhole garden, you eliminate most of the pathways and increase growing space. The way to create a keyhole is plan out a circle in the center of the plot, then one pathway going into the garden. In this way you can sit in the middle of the garden and reach all the way around you. Scale the circle to allow for 3-4 feet from the edge of the circle to the edge of the garden plot to assure you can read all areas of your garden.

Read Community Garden Plots: Make the Most of Limited Space via Green Living Ideas

More information on raised bed gardening

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

News: Bronx community garden transformed with sustainable improvements via Inhabitat

News: Bronx community garden transformed with sustainable improvements via Inhabitat

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A newly renovated community garden has officially opened in the Bronx. Fannie’s Garden at Paradise on Earth, a venture of the New York Restoration Project (NYRP), received a dramatic upgrade with sustainable features like permeable pavement, a rain garden, and a shade structure designed to support solar panels. The 13,000-square foot-garden offers space for urban residents to escape the city, get their hands dirty in 24 garden beds, and enjoy the colors of native plants. 

Read Bronx community garden transformed with sustainable improvements via Inhabitat


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library