The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

While the city scrambles to sell the lots for redevelopment, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has been working with residents to turn some into parks and community gardens. Now a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association from South and her colleagues points to evidence that their efforts are, in fact, having a positive effect on residents’ well-being. In particular, turning lots into green spaces alleviated the feeling of depression among residents who live in the poorest neighborhoods the researchers studied.

Read The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)

Introduction:

Everybody Has Something To Offer: Components Of Garden Leadership

The following description of leadership roles is by no means meant to be complete. Seattle P-Patch gardens employ many creative examples of management. Your P-Patch would not function but for the leadership roles assumed by gardeners every year. The degree of leadership varies from site to site. Individuals and/or groups oversee, facilitate, and delegate the tasks necessary to manage a whole P-Patch. The framework suggested below can be done either individually or as a team.

Read A community garden leadership handbook via the City of Seattle (PDF)


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

How to Start A Community Garden via Marin Master Gardeners

How to Start A Community Garden via Marin Master Gardeners

How to Start A Community Garden via Marin Master Gardeners

Why Start a Community Garden?

Those who are lucky enough to have sunny backyards or balconies can plant a garden whenever they have the time and energy.  But what about those who do not have a place to garden?  For these people, community gardens may be the answer. Many families without adequate space to garden at home would like to grow their own fresh fruits, vegetables, herbs, as well as flowers, while saving money on their food bills.

And for many, gardening is a relaxing way to exercise and enjoy being outdoors.  There are also families who would like to grow traditional foods not available in the supermarket, while offering an opportunity to pass along cultural gardening practices to younger generations.

Read How to Start A Community Garden via Marin Master Gardeners


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

A Community Garden in Dundee, Scotland – A Segment from Beechgrove Garden Ep. 13 (BBC Scotland)

A Community Garden in Dundee, Scotland - A Segment from Beechgrove Garden Ep. 13 (BBC Scotland)

Watch A Community Garden in Dundee, Scotland – A Segment from Beechgrove Garden Ep. 13 (BBC Scotland)

Read/Download the Beechgrove Ep. 13 Fact Sheet (PDF)


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Start a Community Garden: Find and Design a Site via HouseLogic

Start a Community Garden: Find and Design a Site via HouseLogic

Start a Community Garden: Find and Design a Site via HouseLogic

A well-designed and located community garden can make any neighborhood more attractive and even boost property values. A 2008 article in Real Estate Economics found that in New York City, a 6,000-square-foot community garden added 3.4% in value to a property located next to the garden. After five years, the same garden added 7.4% to property next to the garden and 1.9% to property 1,000 feet away.

Garden groups

Some 18,000 to 20,000 people nationwide, according to the American Community Gardening Association, are planting vegetables and flowers in parks, vacant lots, schools, office parks, and even cemeteries. If you’re looking for a perfect community garden spot, here are some things to keep in mind.

Read Start a Community Garden: Find and Design a Site via HouseLogic


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council

Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council

Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening CouncilLogo desktop 2x

1. Kid gardens must be kid-based.
This means that kids help generate the ideas for what will be there, help with construction and planting, and are responsible for maintenance. Grown-up’s need to facilitate and show how, but not do everything. Focus on the process of involving them, and they will then take ownership.

2. Develop the garden to be appropriate for the site and regional conditions.
Involve the kids in the site analysis process so they understand how important the light, soil, drainage and other environmental factors are to having a garden. Develop the garden so the features and plant choices are adapted to local conditions, so you are not “working against nature.”

3. Focus on functional garden design, not how it will look.
Start the design process by determining what the children want to be doing and learning in the garden. Base the features on the practical functions they will serve, and don’t worry too much about aesthetics. Gardens that serve as hands-on learning laboratories for kids will be beautiful because they are well-used and well-loved spaces. Also remember that the children’s sense of what is pretty may not be yours; that’s ok because the garden is their space.

Read Ten Tips on Gardening with Kids via American Community Gardening Council


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald

PITTSFORD — The Pittsford Village Farm isn’t just growing vegetables: It’s growing gardeners.

And in Pittsford, they start them young.

From 11 a.m. to noon every Saturday, the Pittsford Village Farm Community Garden hosts its new Sprouts Club, teaching young people the ins and outs of gardening, from earth worms and healthy soil to different varieties of cherry tomatoes.

The club was the brainchild of co-founder Laurie Kamuda of Kamuda’s Country Market, who wanted to do something for the community garden, and the local kids as well.

So she, fellow community member Ginny Carroccia and community garden coordinator Krysta Piccoli decided to join forces and put the two ideas together: a kids garden club, with an 8-foot by 20-foot community garden plot all their own.

Read Saturday Sprouts Club helps kids find roots via Rutland Herald


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library