How My Little Community Garden Plot Went From Flop To Flourish via NPR

How My Little Community Garden Plot Went From Flop To Flourish via NPR

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/17/543421360/how-my-little-community-garden-plot-went-from-flop-to-flourish

I spent two years dreaming of sun-warmed tomatoes, towering sunflowers and home-grown salad greens before a spot opened in my community garden in Washington, D.C.

When I first met plot 56 in September of 2015, it was a mound of grasses, vines and cilantro gone to seed.

I had no experience with a vegetable garden of my own, but I knew I was just the person to tame this 4- by 8-foot raised bed. I grew up watching my dad grow veggies. I worked on a flower farm in high school. And I trained as a plant biologist. So I know something about encouraging a seed to grow.

Here I am in 2015 confidently posed by the weeds I was ready to conquer.

Read How My Little Community Garden Plot Went From Flop To Flourish via NPR


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

How to turn dirt into soil via Alternet

How to turn dirt into soil via Alternat

Kyle ellefson 196125 unsplash

Kyle Ellefson

When we broke ground for a garden at our 80-year-old house in the middle of Seattle, we took the most obvious thing for granted. Again and again, we crisscrossed the yard surrounding our new home, imagining where we’d plant trees to screen us from the street and neighbors. We fantasized about where we’d sit on warm summer evenings. We watched how the sun and wind moved across the yard through the seasons before choosing a place for our veggie bed. We spent months pondering every little detail, but we had overlooked the biggest one: our soil.

Through the rest of August and into fall, we struggled with planting and accepted our only option—do what we could with the soil we had. We’d never get rid of the glacial till deep down, but we could restore life to the ground above it. Imbuing our soil with life meant we needed to add dead things to it—organic matter. Soil, after all, is the gut of the Earth, and organic matter is the lifeblood that makes this great gut work.

Read How to turn dirt into soil via Alternet


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

Aunt Katie’s Community Garden could grow thanks to EPA grant via the Dothan Eagle

Aunt Katie’s Community Garden could grow thanks to EPA grant via the Dothan Eagle

Aunt Katie’s Community Garden could grow thanks to EPA grant via the Dothan Eagle

Growing season has arrived inside Aunt Katie’s Community Garden, and executive director/co-founder Michael Jackson hopes a federal grant will soon create another blooming season for his facility.

Potential expansion of the community garden located at 602 Linden St. is the first major project the City of Dothan has addressed with an Environmental Protection Agency Brownfields grant it received in 2017. The EPA awarded Dothan $300,000 to help turn potentially environmentally unsound properties into attractive lots that could spur economic development in various areas.

Read Aunt Katie’s Community Garden could grow thanks to EPA grant via the Dothan Eagle


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library.
Check it out! † Available from the LA Public Library

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

A new study finds turning vacant lots into green space can improve the mental health of residents in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.

More than 43,000 lots in Philadelphia sit vacant, many invaded with overgrown weeds and strewn with trash. As CityLab has previously reported, this is as much a public-health problem as it is an economic one. Walking past such a site, researchers have previously found, can make your heat beat just a little faster, indicating increased levels of stress. And it’s no wonder: Studies have also shown that urban blight tends to attract crime and gun violence.

It’s all taking a toll on the mental health of residents in vacancy-hit neighborhoods. “People felt that [the vacancies and abandonment] fractured ties between neighbors, [affecting] the social milieu of the neighborhood,” says Eugenia South, a senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine who’s been studying the health effects of urban blight in Philadelphia. People also told her that they “felt stigmatized, neglected by the government,” as well as experiencing “depression, anxiety, stress, and fear.”

Read The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable

Kelly Lay has been gardening since she was three-years-old. 

Now a nursery specialist at a Lowes in central Illinois, Lay has turned her natural gift for gardening into a profession. And in her spare time Lay moderates r/seedswap, a small Reddit group dedicated to the swapping of seeds. Yes, honest to goodness seeds.

Cherimoya, mizuna, pineapple tomato, sweetsop, lemon cucumber, husk cherry, and pond apple seeds are among the many varieties of seeds being traded on r/seedswap, which facilitates national swaps online. There are also several groups on Facebook like the Great American Seed Swap/Trade Project.

Read The online seed-swapping communities bringing the internet back to nature via Mashable


Lend A Hand and Help A Garden Grow!

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture

Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture

S ACGA

This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground. These lists are in no way meant to be complete. Each main idea will probably trigger more questions, so an assortment of ways to carry out that idea are presented; pick and choose those that seem to apply to your own situation.

FORM A PLANNING COMMITTEE

  • Determine if there really is a need and desire for a garden
  • What kind of garden–vegetable, flower, trees, a combination?
  • Who will the garden serve–kids, seniors, special populations,people who just want an alternative to trash?

Read Starting A Community Garden from Aggie Horticulture


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Community Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab

While the city scrambles to sell the lots for redevelopment, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has been working with residents to turn some into parks and community gardens. Now a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association from South and her colleagues points to evidence that their efforts are, in fact, having a positive effect on residents’ well-being. In particular, turning lots into green spaces alleviated the feeling of depression among residents who live in the poorest neighborhoods the researchers studied.

Read The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green via CityLab


Help us make th  Garden Grow

Photo: Markus Spiske

Help Us Make The Garden Grow!

We need volunteers of all sorts, especially for our Board of Directors who are moving the process forward each month.

Join us and plant the seeds of a new garden in your neighborhood!

Join our mailing list and get involved! 


Learn more about community gardens with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library