News: Growing healthy food for kids at the Shiloh Community Garden via Mountain Xpress

News: Growing healthy food for kids at the Shiloh Community Garden via Mountain Xpress

News: Growing healthy food for kids at the Shiloh Community Garden via Mountain Xpress

Norma Baynes was born and raised in Asheville’s Shiloh neighborhood. As an adult, she moved to Maryland, where she lived for 40 years before deciding to return home in 1996. “I moved back to the same street I was raised on,” she says. A few years later, she helped to found the Shiloh Community Organization. In 2004, the Shiloh Community Garden was born.

“It was very important that we start a garden where people could come and access food,” explains Baynes. “We give our food to the community. We don’t ask people to pay for it. Economically a lot of people can’t afford certain things. With a garden, people could come pick it themselves,” she says. The garden grows herbs, greens, tomatoes, peppers, squash, okra and so much more. “These days people eat a lot of fast food,” says Baynes. “Healthy food is very important.”

Read Beverly Elementary students learn in community garden via The Inter-Mountain


Learn more about community gardens with these books

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Pat’s Top 5 Spring Garden Hacks via IdeaStations

Pat’s Top 5 Spring Garden Hacks via IdeaStations

Pat's Top 5 Spring Garden Hacks via IdeaStations

As your spring garden stretches and unfurls, more intense heat and cute but oh-so-pesky garden pests are also making their timely appearances.

Here are a few of my favorite garden hacks to keep your spring edibles producing abundantly.

1. Upcycle Wine Bottles

Upcycle old wine or fancy water bottles by filling them with H2O and inserting them upside down in the soil to provide your plants’ roots with just the right amount of moisture. The bottle will create a vacuum so that it only waters at the rate at which the soil dries. I like to find beautiful cobalt blue and olive green bottles and remove the labels (another project in itself) so that these functional pieces add an interesting artistic touch to the garden as well.

2. Pick Out the Pests

In order to keep up with leaf-munching insects while avoiding insecticides (even the natural ones), take the Zen monk approach and simply do a little up-close garden appreciation stroll daily. 

Read Pat’s Top 5 Spring Garden Hacks via IdeaStations

More information on raised bed gardening

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our organization
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library